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Groups > Managing Behaviour - Positive Approaches

Have you found a successful approach that you'd like to share with others? Or do you need help with behaviour management? Approaches and strategies we aim to cover in this group include:

Approaches and strategies we aim to cover in this group are:

  • Engaging peer support - buddy schemes, mentoring, peer mediation, circles of friends
  • Restorative approaches - restorative language, practice and conferencing
  • Developing policy and procedure - moving from behaviour policies to relationship policies
  • De-escalation strategies and de-briefing after incidents

Visit the Behaviour Hub for advice, features and tips on issues surrounding behaviour.

Group Leader: Peter Keane, Primary Behaviour Development Officer, Chuter Ede Education Centre, Tyneside

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  • Add a message to the Managing Behaviour - Positive Approaches group
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    • LGB Research Help Please
      15 January 2011 - 13:20
      Hi all, I am completing a study for my MA in youth work. My Dissertation title is: Do LGB practitioners who work with young people have a choice to be in or out at work?

      Do you identify as Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual?
      Do you work with young people?

      Yes! Then please click the link (or copy and paste into the address bar) to complete the survey, I want to know what you think whether you are out and proud or private about your sexuality.

      http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/YL8HV2W

      I'd appreciate your support in the collection of data whatever your experience may be and please pass the link on to anyone you know who meets the criteria for research. Thank you Gemma Fortune
    • Managing Behaviour
      10 November 2010 - 12:26
      10 reasons children misbehave in P.E lessons

      1. They are not challenged – task too easy
      2. Task too difficult – often results in a reduction of effort. This helps you to preserve your image & self esteem in front of your peers. i.e – ‘I couldn’t’ do it because I couldn’t be bothered to try rather than I am not good enough’ – Modify the playing area and equipment to prevent this!
      3. Activities boring! – Too much chat and not enough action. Repetitive practices
      4. Peer pressure
      5. Don’t like / respect the teacher / coach
      6. Lack of recognition for good behaviour/performance/effort
      7. Special needs & behavioural problems (e.g ADHD, autistic, etc)
      8. More freedom & less physical space
      9. Don’t like sport, P.E & exercise, etc
      10. They are not challenged in their best way of learning. (i.e – A dominantly kinetic learner who is bombarded with verbal information)

      The 6 C’s of Control

      Clued Up
      • Know the schools and the P.E Dept’s behaviour policies (including physical restraint)
      • Does the school have a code of conduct?
      • Does the school teach citizenship & the three R’s (Rights, Respect, Responsibilities
      • Discuss acceptable sanctions with the relevant class teacher (e.g time out, detention, phone calls home etc)
      • What is the department policy on ‘non-doers’ – Those without P.E attire?

      CALM
      • Children who misbehave want attention and aim to get a reaction from you. If they don’t want to play sports much, sidetracking the coach to provide some alternative entertainment is a good game! Staying CALM reduces the drama of a situation and they either lose interest, or they progress to doing some really awful so you remove them from the lesson completely. If behaviour is not dangerous, and doesn’t have a negative impact on others - ignore it.
      o If you do need to discipline someone – let the rest of the group carry on and have a quiet word with that pupil (remaining in view of the group). This means they don’t get the boisterous reaction they want.

      CONSISTENT
      • Treat all pupils the same regarding disciplines, regardless of previous behaviour or reputation. Most children have a very strong sense of what is ‘fair’. Perceived injustice is a huge cause for frustration and can lead to lots of moaning! Getting clued up before the first lesson means you can start as you mean to go on in line with expectations and sanctions that children are already familiar with.

      CREATIVE
      Vary your lessons, especially the warm ups! Keep the group guessing what will happen next. If, within the first few minutes they think “we did this last week” they can become de-motivated. This will help to avoid boredom. Similarly, if children can learn a lot from a warm up game and they enjoy it, it’s a good idea to repeat the warm up game placing advanced conditions on the game to produce a development of different skills and more advanced outcomes!
      Use a variety of methods to select partners & groups etc. Try not to let cliques always work together. Differentiate to stretch the more able and support the least able.

      CONFIDENT
      You are an expert who is capable of delivering a high quality session. Your knowledge and ability will be much greater than those you are teaching. Make your body language strong and positive – children will quickly identify, and take advantage of weakness or negative body language.

      COOL CULTURE
      Make the group want to opt in rather than opt out. Identify the key players and dominant personalities in the group and get them on side and the others will often follow. Heap praise on those who are being co-operative and having a go! The group will quickly get the message that this is the way to get your attention. All children really want to be noticed – A successful coach/teacher motivates children to get noticed for the right reasons!

      www.jandcacademy.com
    • Asserting self!
      9 November 2010 - 18:23
      Hi everyone,
      Im a trainee teacher in my third year of a four year degree. Currently I have a 'lively', very young ( Still all 4years old) Reception class of 31. When i have been observed recently the tutor mentioned that I needed to be firmer and shout more when bringing the children back together as a whole. As there are usually two focused groups and the rest are choosing this is a big task as the noise level is usually fairly high. However, im really not a fan of shouting constantly and I would be kidding myself if I thought i could continue to shout over them everyday. I was wondering if anyone had any good tried and tested methods that are a good way to get the whole class to stop, look and listen while you give them the instructions to tidy up as quickly and quietly as they can giving you enough time to bring them together for a plenary. One of the problems is they get distracted during tidying which then means tidying takes longer than needed eating into plenary time and either that or a tidy classroom suffers. So any effective methods to speed them up and allows me authority without shouting myself hoarse and adding to the noise level. Thanks :)
    • positive behaviour in a negative boy
      19 July 2010 - 04:23
      Let me tell you the story of one of my students. I teach him history in Year 8. Last year he failed the course and to come at the end of the year to sit for an oral final exam. His presentation was outstanding. He is very intelligent and articulate but lacks the discipline one would have expected.

      He is the younger in his family and his closest sibling is at least 8 years older than him. No one pays attention to him at home so he is constantly asking for adult attention. This translates in misbehaviour and, lately, lack of respect towards teachers and classmates. He is even suspected of taking marking books from some teachers.

      His first term with me was a disaster. I talked to him last year and this year I was stricter because I know what he is capable of. He went home with a 4 (the Argentine equivalent of an E). He was, of course, more unwilling to have a positive attitude. He came to me once and said that I had marked him with a 4, that he couldn't do anything to make progress. I, of course, disagreed. I told him, with by cold temper, that I knew what he could do, how clever he was and how well he do in history. And I added that I knew it because I had seen it. I don't know which part did the magic. It's been a month and he has done all his homework and been active in class.

      I wanted to give him a positive report (it is one of the ways of praising children at my school) but apparently he hasn't improved in other subjects. Thus I sent a note to his parents so that he would proudly show them he is not just a troublesome boy.

      It is not much, but that note changed his day. "It is the first good note my parents are going to receive in the year".
    • Values Education
      23 March 2010 - 14:52
      Autralian research has shown that Values Education improves behaviour and learning in schools. It is worth looking at developing your learning community using a values based approach.
      Evidence of the impact of Values Education, based on the research of the University of Newcastle, Australia (2010). Dr Neil Hawkes


      When I was interviewed by national ABC in Australia, you will hear that I mentioned the excellent values research conducted at Newcastle University. Often, I am asked if there is any research evidence to support the claims of Living Values Education. I am delighted to inform you that there is a growing body of research evidence that supports our positive claims. Professor Terry Lovat and his colleagues at Newcastle University, in Australia, have been monitoring and researching the effects of the Australian Government's Values Education Initiative. This year the University published its final report for the Australian Government, which looks at the evidence concerning the impact of introducing and developing Values Education in schools (Lovat,2009).

      The research describes how values-based schools give increasing curriculum and teaching emphasis to Values Education. As a consequence students become more academically diligent, the school assumes a calmer, more peaceful ambience, better student-teacher relationships are forged, student and teacher wellbeing improves and parents are more engaged with the school - all claims made by Living Values too!

      Explicit teaching of values provides a common ethical language for talking about interpersonal behaviour. It also provides a mechanism for self-regulated behaviour. An important outcome is a more settled school which enhances quality teaching and enables teachers to raise expectations for student performance.

      The effective implementation of Values Education was characterized by a number of common elements.

      o Values Education was regarded as a school's "core business", given equal status with
      other areas and embedded in policies and student welfare practices;
      o A 'common language' was developed among staff, students and families to describe
      values and the school's expectations of student behaviour;
      o Staff endeavoured to 'model' and demonstrate the values in everyday interactions with
      students;
      o Values were scaffolded by supportive school-wide practices including teacher
      facilitation of student reflection and self-regulation of behaviour;
      o Values were taught in an explicit way in and out of the classroom and through other
      media (e.g. assemblies, sport and cooperative games, drama, songs etc.);
      o Values education was allied to 'real world learning' involving deep personal learning
      and imbued both planned and unplanned learning opportunities;
      o Values education was reinforced through positive visual media as well as consistent,
      verbal encouragement and acknowledgement;
      o Values education was allied to expressed high standards for overall participation,
      performance and achievement; and
      o Values education was optimally introduced under the guidance of the principal and/or a
      team of committed staff.

      The research also revealed that Values Education had an impact in the following areas:

      a. Student academic diligence was enhanced. Students:

      o showed increased attentiveness in class and a greater capacity to work
      independently;
      o assumed more responsibility for their own learning;
      o asked questions and worked together more cooperatively;
      o took greater care and effort in their schoolwork;
      o took more pride in their efforts.


      b. The improvements in School ambience included:

      o conflict among students decreased or was managed more constructively;
      o students demonstrated greater empathy, honesty and integrity;
      o more tolerant and cooperative student interactions;
      o safer and more harmonious classrooms and playgrounds;
      o greater kindness and tolerance among students;
      o students actively seeking to include peers without friends;
      o students taking greater responsibility with school equipment and routine tasks;
      o students treating the school buildings and grounds 'with respect'.

      c) The impact on student-teacher relationships was evidenced by:

      o "more trusting" relationships between staff and students;
      o the establishment of more 'democratic' classrooms;
      o teachers giving students more 'power' by allowing them choices in learning
      activities;
      o teachers being more conscious of scaffolding students to manage their own
      behaviour or resolve conflict with others;
      o teachers seeking opportunities to acknowledge and reinforce appropriate
      behaviour;
      o teachers 'listening' to students and responding to their concerns and opinions;
      o students perceiving that teachers treat them fairly;
      o students behaving "more respectfully" towards teachers;
      o students showing greater politeness and courtesy to teachers.

      d) The positive impacts on student and teacher wellbeing included:

      o students feeling a greater sense of connectedness and belonging;
      o students gaining a greater capacity for self-reflection and self-appraisal;
      o students developing a greater capacity for regulating their own and their peers'
      behaviour;
      o teachers receiving collegial support and strong leadership;
      o teachers obtaining confidence and knowledge through opportunities for
      professional development and through staff collaboration;
      o teachers re-examining their practices and role;
      o the fostering of relational trust among staff and between teachers and families.


      Other research evidence:

      When Values Education was explicit, a common language was established among students, staff and families. This not only led to greater understanding of the targeted values but also provided a positive focus for redirecting children's inappropriate behaviour. Teachers perceived that explicitly teaching values and developing empathy in students resulted in more responsible, focused and cooperative classrooms and equipped students to strive for better learning and social outcomes. When values are explicitly endorsed, acknowledged and 'valued' within a school culture, it becomes incumbent on schools to ensure that staff, as well as students are both benefactors and recipients in respectful and caring interactions. The common focus draws teachers together to create a collaborative and cohesive school community which supports teachers to do their job more effectively. This has important ramifications for students' academic progress and wellbeing.


      Many thanks to Newcastle University's research program which has produced such excellent evidence on the impact of Values Education. I invite you to share it with others so that we can further encourage the development of Living Values Education.



      © Dr Neil Hawkes
      Oxford, UK. 2010



      Bibliography
      Lovat, et al (2009), Final Report For AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Project to Test and Measure the Impact of Values Education on Student Effects and School Ambience. Professor Terence Lovat, Professor Ron Toomey, Dr Kerry Dally, Dr Neville Clement. The University of Newcastle Australia, January 12th, 2009


    • ESBD conference
      7 January 2010 - 11:34
      Dear all,

      I just wanted to remind you very quickly about our conference next month: Putting The 'E' in ESBD: A conference on improving the emotional well-being of children with emotional, social and behavioural difficulties which takes place on Friday 5 February 2010.

      The aim of the conference is for professionals to gain a better understanding of the child and adolescent mental health issues in schools, explore in greater depth the importance of emotions in children with challenging behaviours and to work more effectively with parents.

      It's aimed at professionals in educational settings: managers, teachers, support staff, Educational Psychologists, Educational Welfare Officers, Behaviour Support Teams, Inclusion teams, Home-School Liaison Workers, Connexions Workers, Learning Mentors and others.

      For more information please see here: http://www.tavi-port.org/node/1455

      Best wishes,

      Joshua

      CPD and Conference Administrator
      The Tavistock and Portman
      NHS Foundation Trust

    • please help
      7 November 2009 - 00:06
      i have recently been asked to help out an english teacher because she cannot cope with a particular 14 year old girl. the girl seems to have anger problems and a few problems at home she is getting mentoring but i overheard her saying to another student that she likes me and i would like to help her. she also refuses to work in some lessons as she has told me and will not speak or answer any questions. i feel that she has a fear in speaking in class and of putting her hand up
    • Some advice
      8 October 2009 - 09:51
      Hi there, We provide business mentoring for schools in conjuction with thier enterprise education. While we dont fufill the traditional Teacher roll as such, there are times where behaviour causes a problem. Can anyone give me any insight into way to handle difficult children? specifically which is deemed to get the best results? Reward / sanction. Loud and authoritative / calm and determined.
      Oh we're dealing with Key stage 3 and 4
      Any input would be appreciated.
      D. Humphreys

      Enterprise Education for school
      www.ubiz-enterprise-education.co.uk
    • european comenius project
      6 October 2009 - 18:06
      Hello from La Fleche in France

      I am a .teacher working in a secondary school in MALICORNE in France and I am looking for a partner working in northern Europe ( Finland or Sweeden or Norway or UK or Ireland) to participate to a comenius project " Daily life in a rural place in different countries in Europe" for pupils who are 12-16 years old.( comparison of local activities by sending photos , web conferences and meeting in France )

      May be you know somebody working in a primary or secondary school or contact a colleague who will take contact with me by mail

      desboisbernard@hotmail.com

      http://perso.wanadoo.fr/bernard.desbois





      Thank You for your help

      bernard desbois La Fleche in France

    • reasons children misbehave in P
      1 August 2009 - 01:59
      10 reasons children misbehave in P.E lessons

      1. They are not challenged - task too easy
      2. Task too difficult - often results in a reduction of effort. This helps you to preserve your image & self esteem in front of your peers. i.e - 'I couldn't' do it because I couldn't be bothered to try rather than I am not good enough' - Modify the playing area and equipment to prevent this!
      3. Activities boring! - Too much chat and not enough action. Repetitive practices
      4. Peer pressure
      5. Don't like / respect the teacher / coach
      6. Lack of recognition for good behaviour/performance/effort
      7. Special needs & behavioural problems (e.g ADHD, autistic, etc)
      8. More freedom & less physical space
      9. Don't like sport, P.E & exercise, etc
      10. They are not challenged in their best way of learning. (i.e - A dominantly kinetic learner who is bombarded with verbal information)

      The 6 C's of Control

      Clued Up
      * Know the schools and the P.E Dept's behaviour policies (including physical restraint)
      * Does the school have a code of conduct?
      * Does the school teach citizenship & the three R's (Rights, Respect, Responsibilities
      * Discuss acceptable sanctions with the relevant class teacher (e.g time out, detention, phone calls home etc)
      * What is the department policy on 'non-doers' - Those without P.E attire?

      CALM
      * Children who misbehave want attention and aim to get a reaction from you. If they don't want to play sports much, sidetracking the coach to provide some alternative entertainment is a good game! Staying CALM reduces the drama of a situation and they either lose interest, or they progress to doing some really awful so you remove them from the lesson completely. If behaviour is not dangerous, and doesn't have a negative impact on others - ignore it.
      o If you do need to discipline someone - let the rest of the group carry on and have a quiet word with that pupil (remaining in view of the group). This means they don't get the boisterous reaction they want.

      CONSISTENT
      * Treat all pupils the same regarding disciplines, regardless of previous behaviour or reputation. Most children have a very strong sense of what is 'fair'. Perceived injustice is a huge cause for frustration and can lead to lots of moaning! Getting clued up before the first lesson means you can start as you mean to go on in line with expectations and sanctions that children are already familiar with.

      CREATIVE
      Vary your lessons, especially the warm ups! Keep the group guessing what will happen next. If, within the first few minutes they think "we did this last week" they can become de-motivated. This will help to avoid boredom. Similarly, if children can learn a lot from a warm up game and they enjoy it, it's a good idea to repeat the warm up game placing advanced conditions on the game to produce a development of different skills and more advanced outcomes!
      Use a variety of methods to select partners & groups etc. Try not to let cliques always work together. Differentiate to stretch the more able and support the least able.

      CONFIDENT
      You are an expert who is capable of delivering a high quality session. Your knowledge and ability will be much greater than those you are teaching. Make your body language strong and positive - children will quickly identify, and take advantage of weakness or negative body language.

      COOL CULTURE
      Make the group want to opt in rather than opt out. Identify the key players and dominant personalities in the group and get them on side and the others will often follow. Heap praise on those who are being co-operative and having a go! The group will quickly get the message that this is the way to get your attention. All children really want to be noticed - A successful coach/teacher motivates children to get noticed for the right reasons!

      www.jandcsportsacademy.com
      0208 991 3807

      Teachers T.V website group: P.E and leadership development
      Facebook: Jazz "Sporting Excellence" Rose
      Twitter: JandC Academy
    • parents
      21 July 2009 - 21:04
      parents have to start becoming parents and stop being friends. they need to teach their kids if they want something they need to earn it. spank them when they are behaving badly. this will stop many problems that will show up in the future. they also need to tell them no. no you will not have sex till you are married. no you will not do as you please. do you want them to learn how to use you or will you teach them how to respect you? if you don't discipline them they will just start using you and others to get what they want. that is not love. being nice to people is not love. you can be nice to your own enemy its really easy. love is were you put yourself last before that person or putting them before yourself (for the better good for their lives) always . love is a choice that you have to make. to become a husband, wife, mother, or father, you have to chose to become that. it will never chose you.
    • mgrrowe mgrrowe user profile

      (Associate)

      Re: Welcome
      13 June 2008 - 14:17
      Hi,
      I am interested in promoting approaches in schools that make them places where children love to learn and teachers love to teach. For psychologists (yes, I am one too) "Behaviour" means everything we do: eating, sleeping, burping, talking smiling.....

      I currently work as an independent psychologist introducing schools to the appraoches based on Internal Control psychology, such as those developed by William Glasser through his Choice Theory. I will be working for a large local authority for 12 months as a behaviour specialist beginning in the autumn and plan to collect evidence about the efficacy of these appraoches for UK schools and classrooms (there are already many schools abroad using this framework, but only a handful in the UK at present).

      I look forward to sharing ideas with you colleagues.

      Kind regards,
      Geraldine

      In reply to:
      Welcome

    • pgaston pgaston user profile

      (Associate)

      Re: Count to 10
      19 June 2008 - 08:04
      Hi Pippa

      The count to ten idea is a useful one and made me chuckle! Anything that gives you a moment to gather yourself and to turn back clamly with a smile! I once taught in a classroom which had a tiny cupboard to house the computer which activated the interactive whiteboard. I remember teaching one very challenging group and I would often say "blasted programme....I'll just re-start it...won't be a second" and dive into the cupboard with the door ajar, count to ten and spring out with fresh enthusiasm!!

      In reply to:
      Count to 10

    • pgaston pgaston user profile

      (Associate)

      Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour
      19 June 2008 - 08:26
      Don't question yourself! You have the right attitude. Establishing yourself in a new setting is always a challenge but it also keeps you fresh, makes you re-evaluate your strategies and you will inspire those around you too. With the emphasis on relationships remember it starts on day one. Meeting & greeting your students at the door, saying hello to each of them as they arrive, handing them a 'settler' activity (thank you Richard Evea...inspirational headteacher who was an advocate of this!) or having the stater ready on the board. Routines. Setting the scene. Forget about the SOW for the first few lessons in Sept, this is all about obtaining the right climate for the rest of the year. Spend time relaying your expectations and let the students know what they can expect from you. Most importantly devise a seating plan - your plan - informed from data you may have been given. Let the kids know that YOU may change it in the first weeks but if anyone is desperatly unhappy about it at present to see you at the end of the lesson in confidence (as you never know what may be occurring in the community & neighbours who might be at loggerheads etc).

      You'll be fine - keep in touch!

      In reply to:
      Influencing Positive Behaviour

    • Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour
      3 September 2008 - 20:35
      I'd like to encourage you to persevere and have faith in the longer-term influence of your positive intention towards the children. I've also flagged up the excellent 'teaching with Bayley' video on praise and preparation. In a different context I've also experienced the benefits of reinforcing desired behaviour.

      I'm very new to the classroom, having worked as an outdoor educator and personal development tutor for a long time and just started (today!) on PGCE after time as a LSA with some challenging young lads, but I've seen perseverance and praise pay off, albeit it needs patience and resilience, and you've clearly got that if you're established in the profession.

      Great to see so much momentum towards positive ways of shaping behaviour, in contrast to the 'bang-em-up, string-em-up' posturing and headlines in political and media circles. Perseverance pays.
      :-)

      In reply to:
      Influencing Positive Behaviour

    • Re: Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour
      28 September 2008 - 10:50
      Hi, I'm new here too and likewise am finding it kind of hard navigating my way round!

      But to the point. To combat negative behaviour from the minority of pupils who of course affect the majority, I have found it vital that the whole school community have ownership in devising a Behaviour Policy, and that it is followed to the letter. As part of that,in our school, parents are contacted by letter at the point where the usual teacher sanctions have had little effect in improving the pupil's behaviour. Parents sign the tear-off slip, a copy of the leter is filed and if necessary, a meeting with the Head Teacher, parent and pupil is put in place.

      Last week, one of my Primary 7 boys had a BAD day, swearing at me, leaving the room without permission, refusing to co-operate etc etc etc, and as you can imagine it was a frightening situation for the other 26 pupils in the class as he repeatedly kicked the outside of the now locked classroom door as he was restrained by my fellow Principal Teacher.

      BUT, he was collected by his mother, we followed the policy to the letter, the other pupils reflected with me on what would happen to them if they behaved in this way, and when he came back to school this week, as a class we put together a 'contract' on what we agreed together was the behaviour we would expect in our class (as part of the Critical Skills Programme). Each pupils signed the contract as did I, and they took it home to their parents to sign too. The pupil had to take ownership of his behviour, which he could do when calm, and realise the enormous impact it had on the class community. I
      recently emabrked on the Critical Skills Training at Level 1 and I have to say, it seems to work. My class of 27 pupils (only 11 girls) has 9 pupils who have had dreadfully erratic behaviour over the previous 6 years n school, several having been excluded on more than one occsion, and the dynamics of the class seem to be improving using this approach.

      But, all of this needs a strong class community, and a Head who will support class teachers and ultimately exclude when necessary in order for the remianing pupils to feel safe and to learn.

      oops, rather long winded- but if anyone has experience of Critical Skills and how it has turned their class around, I'd love to hear from you.

      Cheers

      Catlady

      In reply to:
      Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour

    • Re: Re: Welcome
      4 November 2008 - 21:55
      Hi there

      I support your comment on how 'naughty' holds bad connitations. I am an undergraduate student in my third year and I'm researching the impact on labelling EBD children for my dissertation. Labelling can be both positive and negative but who can really define naughty behaviour? Behaviour that maybe regarded as normal or acceptable in one school may not be the same as another - so who's right? How far does a child with naughty behaviour have to go before he/she is labelled with EBD? A child doesn't need to be labelled 'naughty' by a teacher or even a parent to carry on using naughty behaviour because children are often portrayed this way through the media such as children's tv series 'Tracy Beaker' or in cartoons such as 'The Beano'. Children tend to use naughty behaviour to tell us that something isn't right so in that sense we will never move away from the 'naughty' label but on the other hand if teaching styles could be implemented to fit all types of learners then maybe the 'naughty' label wouldn't hold as much significance as it does now.

      In reply to:
      Re: Welcome

    • Re: Teachers with the X-factor
      4 February 2009 - 14:48
      Hi - I am an inexperienced teacher who definately does not have the x factor yet, I hope to develop it one day. A really good lesson is one in which good relationships have developed within the classroom and often teachers who are seen as poor are struggling with behaviour issues in large classes, often with poor support from colleagues. The interesting thing is that when teachers really believe that it is the pupil's responsiblity to behave in the classroom the teacher generates respect.

      As to what makes someone bully - I think a bully is usually someone who has been bullied themselves, they treat vulnerable people the way they have been treated when vulnerable, generally by their family when very young. Often enormous effort goes into addressing the issues of the bully in order to reduce their desire to take out their stresses on others.

      In reply to:
      Teachers with the X-factor

    • Re : Classroom behaviour amongst level 2 students
      14 November 2009 - 16:36
      Hi, I lecture in the FE sector and also had problems with behaviour from the 16+ and in my case 16+ went all the way to 80 year old and staff.
      I watch a video on Teacvhers TV about behaviour with primary school children and wondered if it would work as the generations went up.
      My first attempt was with 16 to 18 year olds, if worked a treat, I then tried it on staff training and had the same success.
      I know watch everything Teachers TV puts on and ignore the age group as I have always found that adults are just children they have grown older and we still have the same conditioning we learnt at a young age and subconsciously revert to childhood behaviour when under stress i.e. not challenged or over challenged.
      Taking the 14 to 19 diploma has also helped and I would appeal to every teacher to take this year long diploma.
      No more stressful days for me and yes they do still play up but at least I know and understand why which takes the stress away because I also know how to resolve misbehavior, it is nothing personal just behaviour.

      Good luck

      Chris Beesley-Reynolds

      In reply to:
      Classroom behaviour amongst level 2 students

    • Re : Supply Teacher
      1 April 2010 - 12:21
      Supply teachers have it hard. I would try to get work in as few schools as possible, that way you get known and you get to know others.

      I'm sure I'd be bored with a worksheet. How did you contribute to the lesson? Among many other things, part of the issue is clearly due to what the students were asked to do.

      You say you gave verbal warnings but they continued.... that's because you simply can't have followed through.

      However, that said if you are going to go down the road of punishment, remember that punishment alone doesn't work in the long term.

      In reply to:
      Supply Teacher

    • Re: Welcome
      14 June 2008 - 11:29
      Dear Peter
      I totally advocate what you are saying regarding the "bad" conitations attached to behaviour. I am a lecturer in Early Years and when I teach my students about behaviour management I try very hard to make sure they understand that a child should not be lablled "naughty" that there is always a reason for the behaviour and they have to identify that reason - it is a diffiuclt task trying to get them to understand this concept but I will continue to champion this cause as everyone needs to understand that children are not born to be "naughty" and once they have this label it is so difficult for them to change their beahviour.
      Well done for starting this forum - I look forward ot reading the comments

      In reply to:
      Welcome

      Replies:
      Re: Re: Welcome

    • Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour
      27 September 2008 - 15:08
      Hi all

      I am new here , and have to say I am finding it challenging finding my way around the message section.

      I teach yr 10 -12, and have all of the issues that anyone else does with this age group. I am a late starter in education - in my 3rd year at 44. One of the issues with student accountability is the separation between life and school. I know when I ask my own kids how their day at school was they usually say "ughe"!

      I have a short form letter I give to students who do the wrong thing. The idea is they fill in their name and what they did wrong. It takes about 1 minute in class. They then take this home and discuss it with their family, get a signature and a comment (the comment is there to avoid forgeries) and bring it back to me. The whole idea is it makes the students accountable at home for their actions in the classroom.

      It's amazing how quick they get the idea. When one student has to go home and explain to their mum why they said 'fuck you' in class, and they tell all their friends how unpleasant it was, the other kid's wise up. Surprisingly, it is easy for me to separate myself from this - they know they did the wrong thing and I am just following the rules.

      Try it out.

      Dave
      Western Australia

      In reply to:
      Influencing Positive Behaviour

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      Re: Re: Influencing Positive Behaviour

    • tdon tdon user profile

      (Associate)

      Re: Violent Behaviour in Early Years
      17 June 2009 - 23:09
      Hi,
      What an interesting child to work with and one i can imagine is a challenge. When you say team teach i presume you meant team TEACCH. I work in a special school for children with Autism and my role gives me the oppertunity to work within the schools outreach dept, if i was visiting him i would on the information you have provided suggest the following:
      Agression is a form of communication, how is his ability to communicate? does he need a strategy in place to support his ability to communicate.
      Behind every action is a motivation, What's his? is it just task avoidance if so break each task down into small sections use a sand timer so he can see what is expected and how long he is expected to stay on task and also include a picture of a reward upon completion of task eg favourite toy. [When issuing rewards again use a sand timer so he can see when the reward time is complete, Which will limit an outburst when he is expected to go back to task] Back these up with symbols if you have writing with symbols/other symbol makers on your computers or take photos these visuals are important as they show him what to do now, the sand timer lets him see how long the task will take and the reward picture shows him what happens upon completion of task. It sounds like he really needs this level of structure. If he has lots of motivators [fav toys] get the school to buy a clear box with a lid place all his motivators in there and take a photo of it so he then is working for the box, which will save you taking lots of different photos also, put his picture on the box - he must be incouraged to take ownership of it although he is never allowed to help himself to the box you conntrol the box and he gets it on completion of task again giving him added structure. This structure will also install a consequence for unwanted behaviour.
      I hope these work and if there is anything else i can help with i would be happy to.

      In reply to:
      Violent Behaviour in Early Years

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      Re: Violent Behaviour in Early Years

    • Violent Behaviour in Early Years
      7 June 2009 - 11:13
      Hi, I'm new to this forum thing but wondered if there is anybody with any ideas. I work as a TA - Early Years in a large mainstresm infant school in Wales. I work alongside another TA and the Teacher. I love my job - But this year we have had a child who has severe behavoural problems. He kicks, throws, spits, swears, punches and scrams in rages on a daily basis. These rages are usually aimed at the staff but sometimes other pupils. Triggers can be anything, but usually because he is asked to do something he does not want to do - i.e come in after play. He is a bright and a lovely child. Outside agencies are involved. We know his background. We were all trained for Team Teach, the teacher in Beahviour management, we implement priase and recognition, positive behaviour and all work great as a team supporting each other and the rest of the class. We have good support from the rest of the school.
      Last year we had a few children with challenging behaviour (nothing on this scale)and I researched alternative strategies because I find this area facinating and some of it helped. This time I am finding it hard as violent behaviour and anger management usually relates to much older children.
      I have watched some of the behaviour programmes this week on TTV but none seem to deal with this type of issue. Any suggestions.
      Or I have an appraisal due and would like to pursue training in behaviour management and wondered what my options might be as a TA.

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      Re: Violent Behaviour in Early Years

    • Managing challenging behaviour through sport!
      12 April 2009 - 15:41
      Long Term Athlete Development LTAD is a way of describing how young people can become better learners both in and out of school, with a view of promoting lifelong learners.

      J & C Sports Academy are committed to developing learning at all levels, ensuring quality control and a quality development process.

      Resilience We prepare children to be ready & willing to learn with a positive - can do attitude.

      Resourcefulness We prepare children to learn in different ways (audio / visual / kinetic learning)

      Reflectiveness Children develop the ability to critically analyse their own performance and practices.

      Reciprocity Children develop the ability to learn alone and as part of a team; both in & out of the classroom.

      Developing the long term athlete begins with training the mind to operate in a positive manner at all times. Children should learn to maintain a positive mental attitude with a passion to improving their own skills and those of others on a consistent basis.

      Coaching is the ethos for leadership & responsibility skills so that children learn to coach themselves Jazz Rose, J & C Sports Academy 2008

      Children take Personal Responsibility In Developing Excellence through the inherent ethos and focus of the coaches within our Academy. We stringently teach children to work well as individuals and within groups. Heres how:

      Speaking about the process of learning. Good coaches ask why and how a player has come to a specific answer, thereby increasing their problem solving skills.

      Visual imagery Good coaches can demonstrate effectively, making learning easier.

      Activities are broken down into 5 key elements, including a warm up and cool down

      Players warm up effectively with a ball each (or as individuals) before progressing to team play and buddy activities.






      Dealing with challenging behaviour

      The way the coach responds when a player is experiencing difficulty or chooses to ignore the rules / boundaries which have been set out before the session is key to the development of every child. Every child matters!

      Giving players an insight into the learning at the very start of the session by describing the learning outcomes for the lesson increases focus.

      Revisiting learning outcomes throughout the lesson giving opportunities for children to reflect on learning, maintains focus of the group.

      Asking children to analyse their own behaviour often diminishes aggressive behaviour patterns and develops positive and caring relationships amongst pupils as well as between pupils and teachers/coaches.

      All coaches demonstrate positive leadership. An enjoyable learning environment is created through the excellent relationships between the children and the coaches Kristina Davison, Dormers Wells Infants School

      Encourage players who are doing the right thing.
      Well done Tim, nicely weighted pass, now can you find space

      Do not get hooked into giving too much attention to negative behaviour which allows positive behaviour to be devalued.
      Coaches will intervene immediately where behaviour becomes unsafe as the learning of others is compromised. Deal with compromising behaviour in a calm and graduated manner.

      Where boundaries are broken consistently, players are aware of the consequences. The key difference with planned intervention is that the coach stays in control of the session, not the challenging pupil.

      Create a group ethic which rewards positive attitudes and frowns upon negative ones. Players learn to understand that their learning and enjoyment is important to them. Give Respect Get Respect!
    • Managing Behaviour - Positive relationships
      24 January 2009 - 01:33
      Although I teach adults,I was recently asked by a Primary School teacher how to manage his children's behaviour in the classroom.

      He found some of them to be very noisy and did not do as they were told. One in particular, he spent a lot of time speaking to.

      I suggested my colleague set up a classroom contract and allow the children to identify the behaviour they want so see and what which they do not.

      I also informed him not to put names on the board of children who he felt behaved in an undesirable manner but to put those up whose behaviour deserved credit.

      At the end of the week, the child whose name was on the board the most received a 15 minute break on the computer. I also informed him to allow the children to decide how they would like to recity the behaviour of the child who was distracting them.

      My colleague informed me that upon carrying out the above, the children's behaviour has grown somewhat. He now sees more children are willing to sit down, do their work so that they can spend extra time on the computer.

      Wouldn;t this be a good idea to infiltrate this within schools on a regular basis, as opposed to identify the negative behaviour at all times?

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      Managing Behaviour - Positive relationships

    • Teachers with the X-factor
      9 January 2009 - 16:53
      I am concerned as any other parent about the effects of bullying. At schools we have Anti-bully weeks in which just the phrase is heard ('anti-bullying') and perhaps a few videos are shown to the children of someone being bullied. But my real concern is how and why does anyone want to start to bully. No-one knows and no-one has mentioned it. Like conventional medicine, schools are treating the symptoms and not the problems. Now lets get to the core issues! Ive come to find that children need to feel good and confident about themselves, just as much as adults do. But when an adult is not confident, they can choose to do or not do what they want, when they want and they can hide it. Children cannot. They have little choice. If the children are being taught with discipline, morals and good guidance with great teachers, they will be happy and confident. Now, 'great teachers' are hard to find. I went to a senior school and only one teacher from the 12 that taught me, made me feel happy, confident, engaged in the work and made me LAUGH!!!!! Mmmmm laughing, now that helps everyone. Consequently, I did very well in the subject... and Science!!. Now, think back to the teachers you liked at school. They were great because.....they made you laugh? kept you interested in the subject and made learning fun? Now, what is a bully wanting, craving? Some fun, a laugh, a joke? They are bored and they need stimulation. I dont suggest that a teacher is constantly sarcastic or even immature enough to come to a childs level with joking about. The child has to know, whos boss, respect and at the same time be engaged in the work that they are doing. Also, children are kinesthetic - they learn by feeling and doing rather than listening. So much 'chalk and talk' can disappear from the mind of a child as they can only remember 10 minutes of information that is spoken to them per day!! Its about time teachers recognised childrens needs and the government make the changes so that children CAN engage in learning. A good balance of fun, laughter and learning per day along with exercise can help prevent bullying.

      Helping children to have a positive outlook is not difficult. Instead of talking to children about bullying and not to do it, talk to the children about how to compliment a person. They will be amazed at how good they feel when they do. This will not only create a friendly atmosphere, but shape the children into what we would like them to become. Mixing peer groups also establishes roles. The older children look out for the younger and the younger feel protected. The responsibility for the older children is automatic.

      Unfortunately today some teachers are not working with children in a positive enough way. There seems to be a them against us attitude, where children will go behind teachers backs and do something that is not allowed, just for their own pleasure. They will say rude remarks or swear, bring in objects that are not allowed to be brought into school e.g. toys, games etc. This is because children have no power. They need to be choosing more at school to satisfy this need. Their needs are similar to an adult, but as they are children, they cannot have the full responsibility of an adult, but need to be fed responsibility in smaller doses. To eliminate this, children need a more tailored education giving them the appropriate responsibility which will be constantly challenging and therefore educating them at their own pace and not the same pace of the 30 other peers alongside them.

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      Re: Teachers with the X-factor

    • Values based approaches changebehaviour
      5 January 2009 - 15:56
      Values education is a positive, whole communtity way of developing real and enduring change in schools. It offers the whole school community the chance to fully develop themselves as individuals in a caring and supportive community.

      Values education was developed as an approach over a decade ago and is supported by Unesco and is found in schools across the globe. It crosses cultural boundaries and in our ethnically mixed society is a good way of progressing understanding and social progress.

      Primary schools in the UK have introduced it and found it to be a positive way for coping with change and improving performance.

      Values come from the individual and are caught by others, the community has to decide what their values are and how they can practise them. Co-operation, love, freedonm, honesty peace, respoect, responsibility are some of the values teachers and children identify as important.
      You can find out more by looking at www.livingvalues.net
      Visit a values based school if you can, you will see what a pleasure their pupils are.
    • Julie Mc Julie Mc user profile

      (Associate)

      I use a couple of ideas successfully with my classes
      12 October 2008 - 22:31
      I have devloped a couple of approaches in my class that have oved very helpful in terms of encouraging self-esteem, self-control, self-motivation and the second of my aproaches also encourages self-rewarding which is an extreme kind of personalised learnig. It enables children to become aware of the kid o internal reward the give o themselves when they do something worthwhile ie feel proud, feel happy, feel excited, feel pleased etc, etc, etc.

      1. Below is a description of the process that I give to my TA's so that we are all wrking to the same song sheet. They need support to 'hang on in there' until the positive results emerge. It always seems as though there will be NO RESULT for a long time (in fact the time it takes is usually just a little bit longer than you are naturally prepared to ive it...so a keenly developed sense of patience is absolutely essential) and then, if you HANG ON IN THERE for a little longer positive results DO emerge. Most challenges have the same kind of patern. Just when you feel like giving up is THE TIME to keep going because you are ALMOST THERE. This process has always been successful but it does require a stong level of faith because results are not imediate... on the other hand they are worth waithing for.

      Positive Reinforcement

      We CAN make things happen!

      First we have to have a vision of what we want to happen.
      Next we need to behave as if has already happened.
      Then we have to notice every piece of evidence that confirms that it is happening.
      We live in the real world and, sure, other things might happen (just like babies topple and fall sometimes when they are learning to walk) and as we notice and pay attention to every positive step we WILL see more of themand moreand moreand more
      The trick is to keep focused on noticing all the positive steps.
      Allow everything else to flow straight pastbe looking elsewhere; talking about something/someone else; noticing
      Something /someone else; busily finishing something; talking to the child next to the one explaining whats wanted to give the one a clue indirectly etc.
      Think of yourself as a precious gift (because you are!) and spend the day gifting yourself, your time, your attention, your eye contact, your smile etc, just at the right moments to reinforce the positives that we are looking for.
      Every time you connect you are switching something on. SWITCH ON THE POSITIVES WE ARE LOOKING FOR.
      Go MAD. Use your gifts of thought, word and deed to MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

      2. The second approach I use is CLEAN LANGUAGE. I have used this this enhance social cohesion in the classroom; to enhance thinking skills and to aid with behavioural problems in the classroom and the playground. Clean Language consists on a set of extremely open questions that are asked in a particular style. In the playground I have developed a model to enable children to solve their own problems in a particularly short time. Not only do they come up with their own solutions with minimum input from me but they also get to model the process so they can learn how to do this without me altogether eventually, so they can become well equiped to solve their own probelms independently. I am currently doing some research on the impact of CLEAN LANGUAGE IN THE CLASSROOM

      If you would like to see some examples of its use let me know.


      Warm wishes

      Julie







      Replies:
      Re: I use a couple of ideas successfully with my classes

    • Suggestion for SEN/visual enhancement of this resource
      3 September 2008 - 20:50
      Thank you for posting this, I'll look at how I can use this approach in my own lesson planning.

      A thought, from the perspective of one with thick glasses, and thinking of those who are colour blind or otherwise visually impaired to a lesser degree: I find colours like yellow, orange, and sometimes green can be hard or impossible to read, even on a screen - you just need to look at some of the more badly-designed websites and PPT presentations to see this. In schools with poor lighting and/or no ict whiteboards this is an even greater problem.

      Suggestion - alongside the colour scheme, use a black-on-white distinctive symbol for each category. If I can get some ideas drawn and uploaded sometime I'll post it here. It might just make it easier to maintain the idea of this excellent system for structuring task information beyond the ICT whiteboard.

      Thank you again.
    • Improving behaviour in the classroom
      20 June 2008 - 18:55
      Hi, I work as an interim manager and tend to go into schools where there is challenging behaviour for a variety of reasons such as poor support from Senior Management, a behaviour policy that is too complicated and paper drivien, poor classroom teaching and pupils who cannot control their behaviour.

      To help improve behaviour encourage a community approach to behaviour. Agree and set fair and simple guidelines as to what is expected of pupils when they are preparing to enter the classroom; how they are to behave at the beginning of the lesson (get out a book and read for until the lesson starts, learn key subject spellings and test each other...)how to behave during the lesson. Remember to get into your pupils thinking that the biggest crime in the classroom is to stop other people from learning. They then have to appreciate that disprutive behaviour hurts their classmates and their classmates learn that they are entitled to learn. Stick to the standards that you and they have set. Remember, being consistant is essential, it may take some time but you will get a class that comes into your room to learn and thus develop their skills and knowledge.
      Have a place where pupils who disrupt can go until they are ready to return and behave - I know this can be difficult as some schools do not encourage this but within the department if teacher help each other this can work and produce improvement in behaviour and attitudes as the pupils know that their teachers support each other.

      Introducing them to living values education (LVE)in your class or as a school development is also a useful way of developing an ethos that generates a positive attitude to the school community as teachers and pupils are working together to demonstrate positive community values in the classrom and school. It may take time but it does work.
    • Bottoms up!
      16 June 2008 - 08:46
      "I is sat down for reggisraton, sat down 4 the whole of da first mental activity, sat down in arsemblee, sat down on the carpet for an xtended intruducten to litracy, sat down back at my desk....Wayne, Ryan, Apple and Bobby-Jo are all climbin the walls and Jack's just told the head to 'stick it where the sun don't shine, sir' ;
      ok, I'm not messing about or the other 25 pupils but that does not mean that all this sitting is doing us 'good' kids any good.
      Active learning please; when we were babies we moved and learnt with all our senses - we were not meant to sit on our bottoms for 8 hours a day!"
      Noaw Jones
    • pgaston pgaston user profile

      (Associate)

      Re: Welcome
      13 June 2008 - 20:09
      Delighted to see this group has formed and to read so many comments which mirror my own way of thinking. I'm an AST for the Local Authority specialising in behaviour for learning. My recent MA study used student voice to articulate what is it that successful practitioners do in order to achieve excellent behaviour in their classrooms. The students (as we would expect) focussed upon relationships and mutual respect.

      Also, as far as whole school policy really working...If anyone has the chance to visit I would reccommend Seven Kings High School where the chair of 'Learning behaviour' (small 'b' intended by him in the title in order to give emphasis to 'Learning'), Sir Alan Steer is head. Consistency as we know is the key, and there really are consistency of approaches at this school - its his passion.

      I'm totally devoted to positive approaches and particularly excited about the powerful use of non-verbal as well as verbal language.

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      Re: Re: Welcome
      Re: Re: Welcome

    • Learning about behaviour
      13 June 2008 - 14:32
      Hi

      What a fascinating group! I'm pleased to join! I am a lecturer and PhD student who is currently researching the way that teachers learn to teach pupils who experience social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. My rationale is that in universities we have to some how prepare teachers to go into classrooms and support children and young people...and while telling and sharing strategies is very useful....I'm interested in the implications for models of continuing professional development. I am a bit of a 'behaviour anorak' and am passionate about trying to achieve positive outcomes for this particular group of pupils...and so any discussions with colleagues who also work in the field will be valuable. Look forward to sharing thoughts and picking some brains!

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      Re: Learning about behaviour

    • keeper keeper user profile

      (Associate)

      Welcome
      12 June 2008 - 17:52
      Hello and welcome to the group. I'll be posting information and comments here about positive approaches to managing behaviour and changing the conversation we have about children in difficulties.
      This isn't easy. To demonstrate this, try this exercise at your next staff meeting:
      Without preamble, invite everyone to spend a couple of seconds picturing a piece of behaviour they have witnessed in the last week.
      Then ask for a show of hands if you were picturing a positive piece of behaviour.
      If you get more than two optimistic souls, let me know. In education circles and beyond the very word Behaviour comes with (bad) automatically appended.
      We need to detoxify the word or find some new words to describe what we want. I'll be talking about the Relationship policies we are building in South Tyneside. I look forward to sharing your experiences and ideas.
      Let's get the conversation started!

      Peter

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      Re: Welcome
      Re: Welcome
      Re: Welcome
      Behaviour advice reports