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Early Years Foundation Stage

Part of the series Need to Know

This video was filmed before the May 2010 general election, and may not reflect the policies of the current government.
  Screen capture from Early Years Foundation Stage

Summary

Mike Baker explains what the new Early Years Foundation Stage Framework will mean for early years practitioners when it becomes statutory in September 2008.

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http://www.teachers.tv/videos/early-years-foundation-stage-1

 

He details what you need to know about the new framework and how it will affect the daily work of birth-to-five settings.

Ruth Pimentel is responsible for implementing the new framework, stressing that it builds on existing best practice to help teachers and childminders to provide the best start for children, whilst nursery school headteacher Julian Grenier warns against wrongly interpreting the framework as encouraging "tick-box teaching".

Note that the contents of this programme may no longer reflect current Government policy

 
 

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Extra materials (3)

Download this document to read the programme's subtitles

A list of publications recommended by the education consultant for this programme

Supporting information provided by the educational consultant for this programme

Related links (3)

Comments (22)

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    • Re : Foundation stage practioner
      4 November 2009 - 22:25

      I am a trainee teacher currently studying a PGCE and it is quite demoralising to hear from virtually every EYFS teacher I speak to about how demanding the paperwork is and all I seem to hear is "rather you than me" from KS1/2 teachers.

      Many interesting points are brought up in these comments however, if the Government are wanting to promote EYFS and are trying to encourage people into become Early Years/KS1 teachers, surely all these teachers with valuable experience can't all be wrong?
      It is all very well someone on a TV programme saying "most of this you will already be familiar with" but for us wannabe teachers who aren't familiar with this, it's a bit of a step into the unknown.

      From a slightly anxious Trainee Teacher.

    • totally agree with
      6 May 2009 - 20:09

      totally agree with rumplledone,the eyfs is more concerned with paper work and ticking boxes. i work in a playgroup and out of school setting and have 2 do the same as a nursery and reception class. every 1 i have spoke 2 in a variety of settings feel we are being taken away from playing and interacting with kids to fill in sheet after sheet of paper work. who does this benifit? ofsted, every 3 years? parents are just bothered their children are happy and well looked after. there will end up just being file upon file stuck in a cupboard that no 1 will even b looking at. roll on the day they decide 2 change it again, and they will as the whole thing is just to much and people are just getting fed up of paper work just 2 please ofsted.

    • EYFS
      9 April 2009 - 21:28

      As owner of a private setting, I don't have the luxury of the resources of a maintained setting, I can't pay my nursery nurses more than £6.30 an hour and I have to burden them with the whims of 'experts' who knowledgable as they might be, don't realise that the children in my setting are there because their parents need to work and need child CARE. Now add to that the fact that child care workers in the private sector may have a level 2 or 3 qualification ( they don't all have degrees yet ) and see how hard it is to get a coherent week of observations, assessments and planning. Routines of changing, feeding and cleaning are a major part of the CARE. Playing and giving attention are a major part of the CARE. Making the child happy is CARING. Encouraging the child is CARING. Comforting the child is CARING. Categorising 2 year old Johnny choosing a green truck through a points chart is beaurocratic nonsense,as is systematic monitoring and jotting notes. Where is the CARE ? How many of these experts have been parents I wonder. Thank God that some children will actually be raised and cared for at home with a parent, without any points or profiles or assessment and may actually turn out as well rounded human beings. I feel for my staff, who just want to care for children and not produce reams of paperwork. Does anyone think that at the end of it all someone is going to sit and decipher each and every child's learning journeys ? Or will they just gather dust on a shelf. How many schools and settings will eventually have nothing to offer besides the positive results of their goddam OFSTED report.

    • EYFS
      21 October 2008 - 19:10

      Having worked in childcare for 20+ years I now have my level 3 and have started on a foundation degree in children and young peoples services, whoopee do I hear some of you cry, however, there is a good reason I inform you of this. I have a cunning plan, to work my way up the Ivory Tower and find the deranged person/people who devised this new system [the dreaded learning journey]and force them down the said Tower and work at least 7 whole days in the manner they expect us professionals and still be of sound mind and body with not the slightest hint of silent screams and rocking in a corner. Being female,[ no offence to the male species] multi-tasking comes natural, I'm afraid miracles take a little longer.
      We are supposed to be educating children in recycling and saving the planet, how do we explain to the next generation about using all the paper and the process we go through, to make it necessary with this new planning??
      Margaret McMillan said " The best class room and the richest cupboard is outside under the sky".
      She had a point, maybe some people should read about the late Pioneers and Theorists, most of it does make very good sense. Now there's a good use of paper!!!!!!!!!!!


    • Caring, interracting, observing and writing-- 0-3 with 3-6 years
      25 July 2008 - 21:18

      I support the idea of the EYFS or government that the early-years of 0-3 to incorporate with the 3-6 years introducing them to early language, interaction, and social development. But there are some advantages and disadvantages as many other educationists and Headteachers have started pointing out and focusing on it.
      In the first place, the colleges and education centers should teach the practitioners and childminders of how to do OBSERVATION, ie, how to interracte, observe and take note so that the activities with the children will flow and stimulate their enjoyment without a heavy load on them caring for a large and mixed group of children.

      Some Tips 1.prepare an observation sheet in a table form and make copies,
      2. choose one child a day and observe him or her while you follow the daily schedule and interacting with the group,
      3. write down your observation view/points you have gathered about that child when the children are doing free play (as quickly as possible), at the same time giving them attention and help when needed without interrupting them.
      4.after writing, pay full attention to the children again and continue observing the same child till the end of the day.
      5. choose another child the next day and follow the same procedure.you can continue observing the previous children and write in their observation sheets.
      6. do some writing each day and do not wait until last minute to do all for the presentation of reports to the education or school management.

      Remember only important points should be taken note both positive and negative aspects,behavior,play,response, willingness,teamwork,literacy etc. of each individual child each day during the learning sessions. Also discuss with parents.

      There may also be a questions to the government, what about if the teacher,educator or practitioners, childminders or headteachers continue their work at home or after duty, that is to complete the writing of the observation reports, if enough time does not permit during the schedule of learning sessions, will specific hours be stated and be considered as official working hours and be paid as overtime?

      What will be the adequate educators- children ratio, if you want the programs to be effective for child development as planed?

      I suggest that the new program should be well planed and well structured to suit the educators to enhance effective care,interaction,observation,writing and total development of the children. There must be at least three to four Staff for 20 -30 children in a group.

      The scale must be balanced that is, the work load, the time, the ratio, the space, the incentive and the development.
      Every individual citizen wants better development and education for their children from birth to early years through adulthood. The Government and the EYFS need to build the strongest foundation and adequate supports for the educators to fulfill these tasks. SEE, JUDGE AND ACT.

    • NEED TO KNOW - EYFS
      30 March 2008 - 19:29

      I personally found the video extremelly helpful. The essence of the new EYFS principles could not have been portrayed more clearly.
      However, when are members of OFSTED or indeed the government going to bravely address the inadequate staffing in Foundation Stage classrooms? We all know what it would take to create the perfect utopia for the wonderful children in our care, but how do you observe and assess a child against such well thought criteria when you have 14 others to be responsible for? This is based on a ratio of 2 adults to 30 children, which is most common. Imagine that at home.
      Great ideas, I agree.But practice may prove that 'No teacher matters'. I come from a different country, where education is based on strong principles of care and mutual respect. Now that in my view, is the perfect recipe for a way forward. The rest would follow as a result. No 'scheduled observations' needed there.

    • EYFS - Need to know
      23 March 2008 - 11:14

      I found this video very interesting and informative.
      As a Pre-School manager several years ago I encouraged the adults to use post it notes to make narrative observations on children during child choice activities and adult focused activities. We would use these notes to set individual targets for learning for the children, which would inform the groups planning.This system worked very well for us and the children. But my concern is for foundation classes in schools, as the group I worked at was very well staffed, and we worked with on average a 1:5 ratio of adults to children, so writing observations wasn't too much of a problem. But it is my understanding that a foundation class of 26 children will still only have one teacher and one teaching assistant giving a 1:13 ratio so how they will have time to keep all the observations needed may be more difficult.
      Also emphasis must also be put on the need for qualified and experienced practitioners as understanding child development and how to make observations and assessments is an acquired skill.

    • I agree with Harveynicks,
      18 March 2008 - 18:06

      I agree with Harveynicks, there is already too much emphasis on record keeping, for a child that is making progress why do we need reams of observations that are not looked at again.

      At a recent meeting with my feeder primary school the reception class teacher asked why we did so many observations!! So I understand how Meray feels when she forsees problems with being taken seriously - we are a setting that has consistantly had good inspections from OFSTED and positive feedback from our LEA adviosr and we're not taken seriously.

      There is too much emphasis on the paperwork and not enough on the time spent interacting with the children.

      PS where is the money to pay the staff to carry out the assessments going to come from?

    • eyfs
      24 February 2008 - 08:46

      I AM A REGISTERED CHILDMINDER WHO AT PRESENT PROVIDES/DELIVERS THE BIRTH TO 3 FRAMEWORK AND AS OF SEPT WILL BE EXPECTED TO DELIVER EYFS I HAVE ALREADY UNDERTAKEN TRAINING AND DONT FEEL THAT IT WILL ALTER MY SETTING TOO MUCH IN THAT I ALREADY UNDERTAKE OBSERVATIONS/RECORD PROGRESS/PLAN FOR THE NEXT STAGE,HOWEVER THE COMMENTS BEING POSTED THAT STATE CHILDMINDERS DO NOT REQUIRE WRITTEN POLICIES/PROCEDURES I FEEL ARE UNFAIR. YES THAT IS WHAT IS WRITTEN IN THE GUIDANCE BUT IT STATES WE HAVE TO EVIDENCE THEM AND MOST OF US WILL ALREADY HAVE ALL THESE WRITTEN POLICIES ETC IN PLACE IF WE ARE OF A DECENT STANDARD(I KNOW I HAVE)IN FACT ON THE TRAINING I COMPLETED WE WERE ACTUALLY ADVISED THAT IT WOULD BE GOOD PRACTICE TO MAINTAIN THESE WRITTEN POLICIES.I THINK OUR PROBLEMS WILL OCCUR WHEN WE HAVE TO WORK IN PARTNERSHIP WITH OTHER SETTINGS IE PRESCHOOLS AND RECEPTION TEACHERS I AM NOT SURE HOW THEY WILL ACCEPT THEY WILL HAVE TO CO-OPERATE WITH ME

    • Need to know - EYFS
      5 February 2008 - 11:37

      Two disappointments: 1 - failing to explain that the four key underpinning themes need to be in place; 2 - saying that all providers will now need written policies and procedures, which is false in the case of childminders. Re. observations - these need to be very short and focussed, just a few key words, and are the key to effective planning and continuity. Babies and young children have periods of rest and activity that don't require constant adult intervention and good settings use this time well.

      Barbara Skilton
      Birth to Three Co-ordinator
      Early Years and Childcare Service
      Worcestershire County Council

    • David Libbert David Libbert

      (Associate)

      Re : Need to Know EYFS version 2
      7 February 2008 - 11:21

      We've had a look again at the programme following your comments Barbara, and have to put our hands up with regard to your second point, about it saying all providers needing to have written policies.

      The EYFS framework does say that all providers need to have records, policies and procedures, but that in the case of childminders these do not need to be in writing.

      We have asked the production company concerned to re-edit the programme to remove this unintentional factual error, and will be putting up the new version before the end of this month.

      David Libbert, Joint Head of Programmes, Teachers TV

    • Need to Know - EYFS
      16 January 2008 - 15:37

      I think this was a good summary but dissappointed that there was such a strong focus on Learning and Development principle which is only a quarter of the new requirements.

      The perennial problem about balancing observation / recording with interacting / involvement with small children at play has no easy solution. This is made more tricky when there is a strong expectation from OFSTED, for school's in particular I think, to demonstrate progress as a result of the provision made. If we are to be discouraged from matching our observations of children at play against the profile statements how are we going to be sure we are helping children travel towards the EYFS expectations? I think we can sometimes be too precious about this and marking a tick on a file will not damage a child! Good practitioners know the children with whom they work well and can look at a statement and if it represents the developmental stage for a particular child. What is important is to make sure we use our knowledge of the child to make certain the provision made helps them to be able to enjoy developing new skills, knowledge and understanding

    • Need to Know - EYFS
      15 January 2008 - 22:00

      It will take a skilled practitioner to write observations without interupting children's play. On more than one occasion I have enjoyed watching a practitioner and child/ren exploring and enjoying an activity together only to feel disappointed as i watch the flow of play interrupted by the practitioner as he/she grabs a 'post it' to record a comment/action from the child, often losing the free flow of play in the process. I have overheard a child asking a member of staff, "What you writing?" - It could be argued that such an observation by the child is a good thing as the child has shown that he is showing an interesting in writing, giving the practitioner the opportunity to add the comment,'understands the difference between writing and drawing' for good measure. However i would much rather such a comment be made in a different context for instance whilst taking an order in the 'cafe.' As 80% of what we record should be child initiated, i fear lots of positive interactions will be interupted by practitioners who have the responsibility to assess, record and measure children's learning.

    • pcn pcn
      tick box teaching
      15 January 2008 - 14:43

      Tick box teaching- so when we sit down and re-read the observations we have written.
      Between a discussion about the wheels on the toy car going round, the nappy changing, the 3 nose wipe for the child with the snuffly nose. Caring for the children will fall by the wayside for we are so busy making sure we are providing them with the next steps suitable for their development.... I know!! Not very supportive of the new frame work, but how am i to give my staff the extra time they require to achieve this?
      Please give me some feedback.